Tag Archives: fun

Camping in Vermont

One of my favorite things to do is get out in nature and go camping someplace I have never been. This summer my wife and I decided to go to Vermont and camp with one of our dogs. We decided to camp at Gifford Woods State Park. We had narrowed the choice down to two different locations. I decided I wanted to check out Gifford Woods.
One of the main reasons I wanted to camp at Gifford woods was because it was literally right on the Appalachian Trail and that would allow me easy access to explore this legendary trail that I had previously never had the opportunity to check out. I wasted no time doing so. As soon as we arrived and unpacked the first thing I wanted us to do was go see where the Appalachian Trail met the campground and explore a little bit of the trail. As soon as we headed out we quickly learned that not only did the Appalachian trail run through our campground it literally lead right past our campsite. I thought I had spotted trail blazes on trees as we approached our campsite, but I didn’t know what they were for. We saw so many hikers pass by on the Appalachian Trail while we relaxed at our campsite, probably between a half-dozen and a dozen hikers every day. And that was just at the times we were actually at our campsite which was not most of the time, most days. It was quite impressive to see all the hikers.
Vermont_August 21, 2018_174
Kent Pond was just a short walk from our campsite. We visited several times.
We had purchased an AMC hikers guide to Vermont and marked off many different hikes we were interested in possibly doing while we were on our trip. There was one hike that we were excited to try out because it was right nearby our campground. We wanted to hike the Deer Leap Overlook hike. It was a relatively short, relatively easy hike with reportedly great views of the area. We followed the directions in the guide-book and parked at the noted parking location and started up the trail head we saw right in front of us. However, we missed one important detail. The trail head we wanted to be going up was across the road from where we had parked. We wouldn’t realize this for quite a while. Once we had been hiking long enough that we were sure we were likely not on the right path we decided to check to see what info we could find on out our phones. We discovered that we were not on Dear Leap but on the Sherburne Pass up to Pico Peak. The next decision was do we keep hiking up or head back down. We didn’t really have a good idea of how long or how far we had gone up or how much farther or longer it would take to reach the top. We didn’t really want to do all that hiking up a mountain without any reward of a nice view. We decided to continue up the mountain taking periodic breaks to reassess the situation and determine if we wanted to kep going and look at maps on our hones to get a sense of how close to the summit we were. We did eventually reach the summit and were rewarded with some nice views. The moral of that story is, if you want to climb a mountain but your wife might not accidental climb the wrong trail because you are both to stubborn to quite once you are out there. My wife said that she would not have wanted to climb the mountain if that was what we had set out to do. We would not have done it. But after having done it she was happy that she had done it and she felt good about having done it.
Pico Peak_August 19, 2018_11
The view from Pico Peak
In contrast to the mountain we climbed we also hiked around a short 1 mile trail at what must have been one of the flattest tracts of land in all of Vermont. There was essentially no elevation change on the trail. It was quite a nice relaxing little hike. This was on the Robert Frost Trail. All along the trail were posted Robert Frost poems to read as you relaxed and enjoyed the scenery which included a beautiful stream, some woodland, and even a more open field like area.
Robert Frost Trail_August 20, 2018_34
Robert Frost Trail.
After a nice casual stroll at the Robert Frost Trail we decided to venture on to a more difficult trail. We really wanted to go see what kind of views we could find overlooking some beautiful scenery. So we headed out to a section of the Long Trail noted in the guidebook as Sunset Ledge. This trail definitely had some challenging sections. It was a good workout. After hiking up for what seemed like longer than we should have been we were beginning to worry that we had gone astray again. Fortunately another hiker was headed towards us and when we inquired she said that we were close and that the view is great. She was not wrong. After a little more hiking we arrive at a nice overlook. We sat and enjoyed the view and took some photographs. We relaxed and just enjoyed being out in nature.
Sunset Ledge_August 20, 2018_41-2
Sunset Ledge
One thing that definitely has to be taken into account is that even when you are looking at a guide-book that gives you ratings of how difficult a trail is to hike with rating from easy to difficult you have to be mindful that the guide is essentially all relative. That means that a lot of the hikes are rated relative to the other hikes in the area and when you are in Vermont many of the hikes are mountainous or require a lot of elevation gain or are very long hikes. So a short hike that is rated as easy might still have over 400 ft of elevation which is not necessarily a lot of elevation gain but it feels like a lot more when you are covering that elevation in 1 mile. So the perceived effort of the hike, how you feel during the climbing of the hike can feel harder than one might expect from a hike that is rated as easy or easy/moderate. Also another consideration is the decent. It sounds simple enough to think that the climbing might be easy but coming back down will be easier. This may very well be true but it might also be the opposite. The exertion might feel like it is lessened but it still might be difficult depending on how steep the trail is and what the terrain is like. Going down a large rock surface can pose bigger challenges than going up it for example.
Vermont_August 24, 2018_264
One of my favorite features of the scenery that just happened to be purely chance and not part of the planning was this stream that flowed across the Appalachian Trail right near our camp. It was just a short walk away. I saw that spot probably more times than anywhere else. I stopped and took photos of it multiple times. It is really cool to me when you find these neet little hidden gems that are not predominant features of the landscape or well-known marked scenic spots and you can just check them out and enjoy it.
Appalachian Trail_August 21, 2018_22
I also got some running in while out camping and didn’t even have to travel to do it. It is a great feeling to be able to wake up put on your clothes and run off onto a trail without having to drive anywhere. I never did get up as early as I wanted for ay of the runs I went out on. I also never quite got the distance in that I wanted. As I learned quickly out on my runs the AT is no joke and you should not underestimate it. But I did enjoy my time running there and I took some videos and photos while I was running.
When we were in the early planning stages of our trip and had decided to camp at Gifford Woods in Killington, VT we started to check into things and see what else might be going on in the time frame we would be there. I was thinking that I would like to find a trail race to run. As it turned out there was a race going on that same week. The Under Armour Mountain Running Series was at Killington Mountain just a short drive from where we were staying. It seemd like the perfect opportunity. The event featured 5k, 10k, 25k, and 50k distances. The 25k was the only distance that really interested me. However, the cut off time was 4.5 hours and that was the amount time it took me to finish my last 25k that I thought would likely be comparable, so I wasn’t even sure I would be able to finish it if I ran. Also, as the time approached I was not in the healthiest place physically. I also wasn’t sure that I wanted the anxiety and worry that can come with having a race looming hanging over my head on what was supposed to be a fun trip with my wife. I decided not to run the race, but we did go and watch the event and cheered runners on and I took many, many photographs of people crushing their races. It was really fun to sit back and watch and enjoy the event as a spectator. I was definitely glad I chose that route. I was still able to get a goo amount of running in and enjoy the rest of the trip as well as take in a cool event. Win, win, win.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_1869
Under Armour Mountain Running Series, Killington, VT.
Then in the evening we found purely by chance what I think was the perfect way to round out and finish off our vacation. While at the running event we saw signs for a free outdoor concert at the same location later that night. So we went back that night and sat out on the side of a mountain listening to music and enjoying being outside. It was the perfect relaxing way to end a trip.

 

Cascade and Porter

When I thought about what I wanted to do on this trip I knew I wanted to take on a series of interesting and challenging activities but I did not necessarily want each one of those activities to be something that would take the entire day to complete. I was really attracted to the possibility of hiking up Cascade Mountain for this very reason. It was noted to be a relatively easy hike for an Adirondack High Peak mountain. The distance was about 5 miles.

Cascade Mountain_July 16, 2018_17

When I looked at this hike in my guide book and I saw that it was a nearly 5 mile hike with a little under 2000 ft of elevation gain I noted on a post it note that this sounded like a run-able mountain and stuck it to the page describing the hike in case I wanted a challenging run. Now maybe as you read this you are thinking, “Who does this guy think he is. 2000 ft of elevation sounds crazy.” And that is probably a very wise thing to think. For me though over the years I have been going for a lot of runs that routinely have that much or more elevation. The crucial miscalculation that I made however is that when I read in the guide book that the hike was 5 miles with 2000 feet of elevation gain I forgot that the guide book is reporting the mileage in terms of a round trip, so 2 miles out and 2 miles back. That means that in reality the climb would be 2000 ft of elevation in just 2.5 miles, not 5 miles.

Cascade Mountain_July 16, 2018_33

Two thousand feet over just two miles is a very different ball game as I soon found out. I am very glad that I did not end up deciding to run this mountain. I planned to hike it. But I still wasn’t expecting it to be too bad. Wrong. This was the most challenging hike I undertook the whole time I was on vacation. The elevation gain started almost immediately. It did not help that just like most days during this trip the temperature was in the upper 80’s. Maybe I only felt like this hike was so difficult is because my style of hiking is to hike along at a relatively quick pace and not stop unless I need to or to take a photo, but I do most of my photography at summits and on descents. So maybe I just push myself harder and exert myself more than the average hiker that the guide book is geared to.

Cascade Mountain_July 16, 2018_55

The field guide noted that since this is a relatively easy hike, yeah right, and the fact that the summit offered amazing views it was one of the most popular hikes in the region. When I got there the parking areas were already filling up. I saw many people on the trails. Some people I passed as I climbed. Others passed me. One guy passed by me so fast that he quickly got out of site and then was on his way back down by the time I reached the summit and I was already half way up when he passed me. Even though this hike was short in distance it as going to make you work. So I was quite surprised at the numbers of people that were there. When I arrived at the summit there were already groups of people there and some were leaving and some were arriving the from the moment I arrived at the summit to the moment I left.

Cascade Mountain_July 16, 2018_70

The views from the summit were great. The down side was, it was hot and there was no shade and despite being on a mountain there was no breeze to be had. It was so hot that the rock that composed the summit was hot to the touch. It wasn’t even comfortable to sit on really. It was difficult to relax at the summit of the mountain under those conditions. Especially for me, because as those who know me from running can attest to, I sweat A LOT when I exert myself and I especially sweat a lot in the heat. So I was basically drenched on top of a giant rock that was open to the full sun and it was acting like a nice roasting pan. So I did not stay at the summit as long as I would have liked. I wanted to get back down into the woods.

Cascade Mountain_July 16, 2018_122

However, before I headed back down too far into the woods I read in the guide book that Porter Mountain was nearby and could be summitted from a short trek across off of the Cascade Mountain Trail. So I hiked back down the trail to where the pass over to Porter was marked and I hiked what seemed to be a lot longer than what it actually was. The distance was probably only one mile but it felt like a lot tougher of a mile than any of the hiking that as done to summit Cascade. I imagine this was mostly due to fatigue from already climbing 2000 feet and then climbing part way back down and then back up to the summit of another mountain that was also over 4000 feet above sea level.

Porter Mountain_July 16, 2018_35

I was really happy be able to summit to different high peaks mountains in one hike, although the view from Porter was not as grand as the view from Cascade. There was a little bit more shade, which I quickly scurried over to and shrunk myself down as small as I could to stay in so I could try to cool off some. There was only one other person at the Porter summit when I arrived. When they left I took that opportunity to stand at the summit alone and take a photograph, and experience I have not often had on other mountains. It was interesting to be able to use my camera and zoom in to see the other people across the pass over on the Cascade summit. I was literally just over there and now I was on an entirely different mountain watching them. That was a pretty cool experience.

If you enjoy the work I do here please join my other supporters on Patreon and support my work for as little as $1.00 a month. It goes a long way to helping me to do the work that I do. Contribute here: KRNaturalPhoto

Scar face Mountain

I picked the location where I camped for two reasons. One it was close to most of the other things I wanted to do while I was on vacation. Two it had a trail leaving directly from the campground to a nearby mountain, Scar Face Mountain. I wanted to have a place I could go without having to really travel anywhere. That way I could hike or run a trail whenever.

DCIM114GOPROGOPR3726.JPG

I scouted out the trail and asked for information regarding it from the staff at the campground on the day I arrived. I wanted to go check it out early the next morning. I was determined to go for my first mountain run. I woke up early grabbed my GoPro and headed for the trail. After getting a little confused finding the trail head I was on my way.

The beginning of the trail was perfect for a run. According to the park staff it was 3.5 to 4 miles to the summit. So I knew approximately the distance I would be running but I did not know how high the mountain was. I knew it wasn’t exceptionally high because it was not one of the 46 high peaks in the Adirondacks. So I would just have to find out what the elevation of my run would be the hard way, by first hand experience. Turns out the mountain was 3062 feet tall. I had 1621 feet of elevation gain and it was all essentially packed into the last 2 miles or less.

DCIM114GOPROGOPR3736.JPG

The climbing was tough. Tougher than I expected. Despite my experience with trail running. I had never done anything quite like this. Running up a mountain. I have had lots of runs with more elevation gain over this distance but it usually consists of multiple ups and downs. This was 2 miles of lat followed by 2 miles of up up up. Climbing is not my strong suit as it is. It is even worse when there is no relief. My heart was pounding with the exertion.

I was spent when I finally reached the summit. I rested for a few moments taking in my surroundings at the summit, which wasn’t much. It was completely forested. No spectacular views to be had as a reward for my climb. I headed back down. The decent at the top was almost as slow going as it was going up. By the time I got to the flat I was getting tired. That last mile back to the camp was tough. I was drenched in sweat. I probably looked like a crazy person to my fellow campers.

DCIM114GOPROG0013742.JPG

I did not utilize that trail as much as I thought I would. This was my only time on it. The views were not what I had hoped for on a mountain climb and there were so many other options to explore, so I didn’t want to commit any more time to a mountain that didn’t really fulfill me.

This run taught me two things. First I am not yet a mountain runner. Second maybe it is best to save an 8 mile mountain run for more than 1 day after you take on 27 trail miles.

Check out my Relive video from my run here: Relive Scar Face Mountain

Check out my Strava account of this run here: Strava Kyle Reynolds Scar Face Mountain

Away From My Desk

Today I am heading out on a camping trip. I am going up to the Adirondacks in upstate NY for some fun and relaxation on my own. People like to say how they are going to disconnect and go off the grid and not use technology while they are away so they can enjoy themselves and live in the moment. I am not really sure that this is the answer, at least not for me. I am not going to stay away from my technology. Technology is what allows me to do what I do. I am going to try to be more present in the moment though.

What that means for me is I am going to stay mostly away from social media. I may check in from time to time and browse my feeds, hopefully a lot less frequently then I do on an average day, but I won’t post any live updates on what I am doing on this trip. No sharing my “Awesome Adventure” with you live. I will have plenty of time to share with you when I return. I will talk to my wife and text with her. That might be the extent of any live updating I do. I hope that it is. Who knows. I may fail at this and you might see me all the time. I have never tried to quit social media before. I believe it has value and enjoy using it. But I also believe it keeps me from getting things done at times. So instead of live updates from me I have scheduled some posts to go up while I am out in the woods camping and working on new projects to share in the future. I am hoping that most if not all of them will be new things you have not seen before. So that’s what will be going on for my web presence for about 10 days.

So what will I be doing on those 10 days? My plan is to engage in all the things I love and don’t get to spend enough time doing on a regular basis. And that is one of the reasons I am specifically not going tech free. My tech allows me to do what I love. I am a photographer therefore I need my gear. I will have more camera gear with my than camping specific gear. I am going to be out there trying to capture exciting photos from my adventure. Then I can share those along with my stories when I come back. Speaking of stories I plan to do a lot of writing on this trip. For me writing requires a lap top. I am going to work on my book and maybe some other things while I am out connecting with the woods.

The things I will be doing that do not require technology will be running, hiking, and hopefully sleeping out under the stars in my hammock. I am camping about 4 miles from Lake Placid and I picked this spot purposefully so that if I wanted to I could literally run down into town and just hang out for a while and then run back to camp, easy peasy. I also picked this spot because I love climbing the mountains and I think this location allows me easiest access as a home base camp to go out exploring each day and hike a new one of the 46 high peaks in the Adirondacks. I have already climbed 3 of them and I would like to add several more before this trip is over. Running is also on the agenda. I don’t know how much I will do exactly but I know I will do some. I have no real plan exactly for that. I will probably be bringing more running clothes with me than anything else. Just so I have plenty of options and opportunity to run whenever it strikes me to run. I really want to try to at least run up one of the high peaks and back down. However, at this point I have no specific plan. Also, another reason I selected my camping location is because there is a trail that leaves from the campground that leads to the summit of a smaller mountain, Scarface Mountain, and I like the idea of being able to summit that mountain whenever I feel like it without having to go anywhere. I would love to get to the summit to watch a sunrise and a sunset then I can just run or hike back down to camp. There really are just endless options of what I can do while I am out there so I am sure I won’t get to everything. But while I am out there enjoying myself I am going to try to record as much of it as is possible on any one of the various cameras I will have with me on this trip.

I also want to get in a decent amount of relaxation. I spent the first half of the year training for my first 50k and while it has been a fun year so far I don’t think I have taken enough time to just sit and relax and I think it has taken a toll on me. I want to lie in my hammock and relax and nap. Or sit back and read a book. I have several on the pile that I need to read and they will all join me on this trip and I will see how many I get through. Last time I took a solo trip I read several books cover to cover, so hopefully I will find some time to read which I do enjoy but have been too tired and to rushed to spend time doing.

Most of all I hope to recharge the batteries doing all the things I love and come back feeling rejuvenated so I can do more and share more with you. I’ll see you in 10 days.

 

 

STRC Kids Donut Run

I am fortunate to be part of a great organization, the Southern Tier Running Club. This running club does a lot to give back to the community. One thing that the club does is organize a youth running club, Southern Tier SOAR. This club is focused on as one might think, youth running and getting youth in our community out and moving. They offer different seasons over the course of the year. Another aspect of what the SOAR club does is over the summer they offer a series of free kids fun runs that are open to the community at large. They offer a different type of run once a month. At each of these events they collect items to donate to a local charity. The June fun run was a Donut Run. It was so much fun to watch the kids running and enjoying some donuts. I was fortunate enough to be part of this as a volunteer donating my time as a photographer and capturing the joy these kids have running. Here are a few of my favorite photos from this event. If you appreciate the work I do please consider supporting me on Patreon at KRNaturalPhoto for as little as $1 a month. Thank you.

What I learned from running 31 miles

There are many reasons to run. One reason that I run is because I feel like running teaches me about life. There are so many life lessons that can be learned through running. I have learned so much about myself from this journey I have taken into running.

One thing I have learned is something that might sound totally obvious. If you want to accomplish something it takes work. You might be thinking, “Well of course it does.” Let me explain what I mean.

DCIM108GOPROG0064951.JPG

I have been very fortunate in my life. I have been able to accomplish a lot of goals I have set my sights on in my life. Things I never would have thought I would do. I graduated college. I earned a masters degree. I continued grad school after my master’s degree. I learned photograph and became pretty good at it. I sold photographs. I became a published writer and photographer. I ran a 5k, then a 10k, then a half marathon, then a 25k. I swear I am not just trying to humble brag. I am very proud of those achievements and they took effort, but they did not take maximum effort.

There were many things I coasted on using mostly natural ability or did the bare minimum to get by. Many things I just chipped away slowly at without a big surge of effort. Very few things in life have I put my maximal effort into, yet I have been able to achieve a lot. I am very fortunate. I try to stay humble.

I am not a naturally gifted runner. No one would mistake me for one and if you saw me on the streets you would not likely think I am a runner. But I have been able to do a lot in running. I have been able to increase the distances I have run over time by just adding a little more effort and a little more training each time. I never put in maximal effort to achieve the best I could do at an event.  I did the bare minimum to achieve the desired outcome.

DCIM143GOPRO

This year I had my sights set on something much bigger. I was going to double the distance I had ever run from a 25k to a 50k and not only that I was going to run a very challenging 50k. Not only did I want to accomplish this goal I wanted to do as well as I could at it. I wanted to enjoy this accomplishment throughout the process when I ran the race. I did not want to suffer through it which would be the case if I put in less than my best effort in training. I committed to training for this race like I have never trained before. I trained hard. I ran when I didn’t want to run. I ran in conditions I didn’t want to run in. I was focused and determined to succeed at this and do the best I could and that required being committed to the whole process and not just the final end goal.

All that hard work and determination prepared me to run the race of my life. I did not win the race, not even close. That wasn’t even a consideration for me. But I did run the best race I could at that time. I was prepared to run the best I could because I put in the work. I enjoyed running a tough race. I did not suffer through it. It was a challenging experience but the kind of challenge that makes you feel good.

Now I am ready to commit to a new goal. One I have thought about and talked about off and on for a long time. I have worked on it in fits and starts. It is one of the many things that took a back seat to my commitment to training for a 50k. But that training has taught me that I am ready and that if I commit to the process I can succeed.

DCIM144GOPRO

Over the years I have talked about writing a book. I started writing it over a decade ago. I have worked on it off and on. I have started working on query letters and book proposals on and off over the last few years. I am always slowly inching closer to maybe possibly some day accomplishing this goal. Now things are going to change.

I love the quote my Michael Jordan where he says “I have failed over and over again, and that is why I succeed.” I failed to complete my PhD because I was not committed enough to the process I was not putting in the work I needed to. If I had unlimited time to work on it I probably would have gotten it done, but that is not how things work. I ran out of time because I didn’t commit enough time and energy to it. Well, I am going to learn from that failure and from this success. My future goals will be approached from a new direction.

Starting now I am going to commit to the goal of writing a book the same way I committed to running a 50k. I am going to be determined to working on the book process 5 days a week. Working on the book will be my number one priority on the list of tasks to get done. Everything else will have to play second fiddle and get balanced and worked on after my work for the day is done on the book. I will work on the book 1 hour a day 3 days a week during the work week. I will work on the book 2 to 4 hours a day on weekends. This will be just like the amount of time I committed to training for and running a 50k. This is a goal I will achieve and it will not be some goal that I will achieve some day. It will be a goal I will achieve soon.

DCIM144GOPRO

I will put in the work I need to get this done. Other projects that I want to pursue may have to be put on the shelf until this one is complete. Some things that are ongoing projects will be scaled back while I work on this goal with singular determination. One thing that means is that there may be less writing here on my website. I hope that everyone following me will still stay in touch and reach out to ask me how things are going. I do love to write so I will still try to post regularly here. I will try to have more short posts so I can stay in touch.

The first task I need to accomplish for this goal is to finish writing my book proposal. In its current form it is probably 50% complete. I need to research some items and then complete it and send it out to agents. Those are my next steps. Wish me luck and feel free to send me as many messages as you’d like regarding this. I would love to hear from anyone who has experience in this realm as I chase this dream.

What do you think I will be writing a book about? Let me hear your guesses.

Please consider supporting my work on Patreon at KRNaturalPhoto and join with the others who already do so I can continue to work on projects like this. You can support me for as little as $1 a month.

Ithaca Dog Park_June 10, 2018_317

2018 Seneca 7

Sometimes I feel like I’m the luckiest person in the world. I have gotten to do so many things that make me happy and make life worth living. Somehow I was fortunate enough o break out of my shell and meet this great group of people that call themselves runners. I have fallen in with this group of people and we enjoy life together running and non-running alike. We have developed this little Elmira running crew who I have spent a lot of time running with over the past few years.

DCIM108GOPROG0013604.JPG

In 2017 we all wanted to run Seneca 7 together but we were not able to get registered for our own team. Several of us did get to experience Seneca 7 that year but not all together. In 2018 we were fortunate enough to be able to all be on one team together.

So for those who don’t know what Seneca 7 is, it is a relay race that teams of 7 run around Seneca Lake in the Finger Lakes region of NY. The race is a total of 77.7 miles long. So when you sign up for Seneca 7 you are committing to a daylong event where you will spend the majority of the day traveling with 6 other people in a van. That might sound crazy, and maybe it is. But when your best friends are runners it is like one of the best days you can have.

You run you, you watch, you cheer. You drive, you navigate, you eat, you do ….. other things all in close proximity of your friends. You have to be very accepting of others to participate in this kind of event. You will be spending a lot of time together and might get to know each other better than you thought you would if you didn’t already know each other well. Seven friends in a van spending the day doing what they love, it’s like a party to me.

You are around hundreds of other people who enjoy what you do and are about the same level of crazy as you. Except maybe those bike teams, they are something special.

DCIM108GOPROG0043672.JPG

I loved being able to do this event with 7 of my best friends. The hardest part for me was the fact that I am a photographer and I like to photograph EVERYTHING. The weather was terrible. It was rainy and snowy. When you are packed in a van like sardines there isn’t room to bring the heavy duty camera equipment that can withstand some rain and snow. I brought cameras but most of the equipment wasn’t durable enough to brave the elements with. I had been really excited about the opportunity to document this event with my friends. Now I had to figure out how to make that happen as best I could. When you are a photographer it is hard to accept anything but the best quality of photographs you can get. At least it is for me. Maybe that is a flaw I need to work on, but it drives me.

DCIM108GOPROG0053696.JPG

I did have my GoPro with me and I worked with that tool as best I could to capture as many moments from our race as I could. I am not as experienced with the GoPro as I am with my other equipment and the super wide angle lens of a GoPro is less than ideal for photographing an event where you can’t necessarily be close to your subject. But the GoPro could withstand the weather. So I had to make it work.

DCIM108GOPROG0123840.JPG

I took a mix of single shot photos, time lapse photos, and videos to try and capture as much as I could of the event. Since I first began incorporating a GoPro into my photography I have been shooting an increasing amount of video. Most of this video I have recorded while I have been running. When you shoot video when you are running there will inevitably be some shaking of the camera. I have a steady cam to use but with the poor weather I also could not use that. So I shot video with my GoPro while running. I didn’t think it would be too bad. One thing I did not consider is that when I normally shoot video when I am running I am running at a more casual pace for me. During this race I was basically running all out. So when you try to run all out and hold a camera steady everything’s basically works against holding the camera steady. So the video was much shakier than I would have liked, but at least I recorded our adventure together.

I am happy to have such good friends. I am happy to be able to capture our fun times together even if it doesn’t come out as well as I would like. I can’t wait to record more of our fun times together.