Buttermilk Falls

I was recently in the Ithaca area getting some trail running in. Post run I went to Buttermilk falls to relax and do some writing. Then I decided what better way to cap off the days trip than to hike down into the gorge and photograph one of my favorite natural places. My knees did not enjoy this post run decision, but I took my time and enjoyed myself and captured some nice images. Enjoy.

Buttermilk Falls_September 12, 2018_44

Buttermilk Falls_September 12, 2018_39

Buttermilk Falls_September 12, 2018_38

Buttermilk Falls_September 12, 2018_29

Buttermilk Falls_September 12, 2018_25

Buttermilk Falls_September 12, 2018_16

FLT Danby State Forest

I have been writing a lot about my trail running experiences. I hope you aren’t getting sick of it because it seems to be a growing trend, especially as I explore new trails. I’ve written about how trail running has allowed me to and encouraged me to explore so much more of the natural world that I love so much. Today was no different.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3115.JPG

Without running, but hiking instead the amount of distance one can cover on a trail in a reasonable amount of time is limited. If I was going to go for a hike would I choose to drive an hour to hike a few miles on some random trails in the woods or would I go to a well known state park where I knew that at least in those few miles I will be able to enjoy nice scenic views. I think I would probably choose a park. Nothing against state parks, I love them and go there frequently but that’s the point. I don’t see something new by doing that. There is less exploration.

Thanks to running I can cover 8 miles in a couple hours.   So that is 8 miles of state forest land I can explore and discover for myself for the first time. Being able to explore that much nature in a relatively short amount of time is worth it to me even if there aren’t any majestic views. That all lead me to choose to go explore the Finger Lakes Trail through Danby State Forest.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3116.JPG

I am not going to try to oversell Danby State Forest. I really enjoyed my time there, but I am sure it’s not for everyone. It is beautiful without being scenic, if that makes any sense. There are no grand waterfalls, or even small waterfalls that I saw along the FLT. There are no lookouts with wide open scenic vistas. You are in a forest just about all the time. There are trees of all sorts. There are roots. There are streams. There are flowers.  And there are countless little spotted newts that I did not stop to take photos of but had I been out on a hike I surely would have. Being in Danby State Forest means enjoying the simple little things about nature. I didn’t even see any people until I had gone about 12 miles of my 16 mile run.

The run itself was very fun and interesting. I really didn’t know what to expect. I didn’t look at the map other than to confirm I could get a total of 16 miles in and stay in Danby State Forest. I didn’t look at contour lines or anything like that. Maybe I should have, but I am glad I did not. If I had maybe I would not have done it. My first thought when I began running on the trail was “oh nice this is rather runnable, not very rocky, no big climbs looming.” Then I started to go down and down and down. This was in the moment fine by me because I love downhill running and the trails were very runnable and I really enjoyed it. But it was one downhill after another without much climbing back up in between. I was loving all the runnable downhills but in the back of my mind I kept thinking “This is going to be a lot of climbing on the way back.” And it was. The first climb I came to I felt like it wasn’t so bad, but then climb after climb just wore me down. By the end I felt like I was barely able to move. I ended up with over 3,000 ft of vertical gain which wasn’t shocking but I was really thinking it would be more in the 2,000 ft range. I really loved the first half of the run with all the open downhill running. I just need someone to pick me up after eight so I don’t have to go back up next time.

I am looking forward to continuing to explore the Finger Lakes Trail, but as I explore it more and more I will need to drive farther and farther from home to reach new trail sections so that might make further exploration a continually growing challenge, but I will find ways to get out there and keep exploring. Maybe at Twisted Branch 100k next year.

Running on the Appalachian Trail

If you are someone who loves the outdoors you have probably heard of the Appalachian Trail. The trail runs from Maine to Georgia. I had heard of the trail and read about the trail, but I had never stepped foot on the trail. That was about to change.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3064.JPG

I was so excited when we planned a trip and we were able to find a place to camp that was located right along the Appalachian Trail I was so excited to get a chance to explore this legendary trail. As it turned out our campsite was literally on the Appalachian Trail. There was a blaze on a tree at the entrance to our site.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3062.JPG

There was a time when I would have hiked on the trail and loved every second of it. But now as my outdoorsiness has evolved to include trail running I was super excited to have an opportunity to run on this trail. I did do some hiking on the Appalachian Trail especially to get some initial exploring in before I set out for any running and that was a great experience in its own right. But still going for a run on the AT was the one must do on my list of activities while we were camping.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3058.JPG

Trail running is in some ways a double edge sword for me. No matter what pace you are moving at during a run you are going faster than you would be if you were hiking so you inevitably cannot soak it in for every mile that is spent on the trail quite like you can if you are on a hike. I think your senses just can’t process all that amazing nature quite the same as you move through it at a running pace. It’s a slightly different experience. The other side of the coin is that when I am running I can explore at least twice as much as I could if I were hiking because of the faster pace. So I get to see and experience more but maybe perhaps not experience it at quite as deep a level. This is especially true for me as a photographer as I am constantly seeking ways to incorporate my photography and increasingly videography into my trail running. But I also se and photograph things I would never see without the running.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3057.JPG

Before I went for a run I scouted out a little part of it as it left our campground in either direction. I determined to first run the trail leaving our campsite from near the entrance. I chose that direction because what I had seen was relatively flat if not slightly downhill. My goal was to run 10 miles, 5 out 5 back. As I started out the trail was just as I had anticipated it was flat or downhill for the first two miles. It was the start of a perfect run. Near the end of the first two miles you run down a very nice boardwalk that is a part of a trail that leads to a waterfall just a short ways away. (We would later return to that waterfall during our trip. Part of the discovery during running I mention.)

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3087.JPG

 

After crossing a road and then entering the woods the trail began to go up. The AT went up and up and up. I am not a strong climber and I do not like climbing, but I would not relent and I continued to climb. That section of climbing went on for at least one and a half miles. Nothing but going up. That climb so completely drained me that when I reached what seemed to be the top, as the other side started to appear to go down, I decided I would call it good enough here at just 3.5 of my 5 mile goal. I wasn’t too disappointed as I know climbs wreck me and it was a tough climb. Not just steep but twists and turns and rocks and roots.

I turned around and descended the mountain I had just climbed. I recorded the decent with my GoPro. I love descents. I like to run them fast if at all possible. This descent took a lot longer than I expected. That is because it was a lot more difficult than I realized it would be even though I had just climbed it. For me climbing is more about strength and exertion and just powering through it. However on the decent it is about being as agile as I can as I watch the terrain ahead of me and try to place my feet accordingly. The unforgiving Appalachian Trail was making that very difficult for me. I was trying to go fast but there were so many rocks and roots and trees and twists and turns and edges to watch. It was above my skill level to run down that trail as fast as I would have liked. AS I reached the bottom I took a moment to appreciate how difficult that section of trail was. How it repelled me and turned me away and sent me back home and taught me a thing or two even on the parts of my running that I felt are my strong suit.

My next adventure on the AT I left the campground in the opposite direction on a trail that I expected would begin with a bit of climbing and I was not wrong about that. There was a significant amount of climbing to start off. One reason I wanted to explore this section of trail is because I knew that I could use this part of the Appalachian Trail to check out another area we planned to hike later, Dear Leap. I wanted to see how difficult it would be to get to Dear Leap from our campsite. The answer, very difficult.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3056.JPG

Once again I started out with a goal of 10 miles. I powered up the climbing in the beginning. Eventually I arrived at the intersection of the AT and the Dear Leap trail. I turned on my GoPro thinking this will be cool to record the run out to Dear Leap and show what the view is like. I started running up the trail. Up being the operative word. There was much more up than I had anticipated. I was very quickly hiking at a relatively slow pace up that climb because it was longer and steeper than I had anticipated and in my excitement I had started out to fast.

I ran out to the scenic view at Dear Leap took a panoramic video of it that hopefully turned out ok. Then I headed back the way I had come. I expected to rejoin the AT where I had left it but instead ended up staying on the Dear Leap Mountain Path and reconnecting with the AT farther along. I eventually came to this nice long gradual downhill. I think it was one of the most runnable sections I experienced on the AT and it came at the perfect time for me. I was getting tired and this section lifted my spirits and helped me recover physically as well. Eventually I crossed a road and ended up getting on the Long Trail and going out on the part of the long trail we should have hiked if we wanted to hike Pico Peak instead of doing it accidently earlier in the weak.

As it turns out time was moving faster than I was and as it got to be the time I would have expected I would run for to get to the half way point in a 10 mile run I was at mile 4 instead of mile 5. I decided that I should turn around anyway. I didn’t want to be gone to long and make my wife worry. Also, I was tired. The way back was not too bad. Going up that nice long descending runnable part wasn’t too much fun, but at least the path was relatively smooth. Instead of going on the Dear Leap Mountain Path I stayed on the AT to hopefully same time and energy. As I got close to camp I began descending the climb that began this adventure I was exhausted. The rocky outcroppings and boulders sticking out of the ground were tormenting me. I couldn’t go at much of a decent pace at all. It was one of the least fun descents I had ever had. But I powered through it and got back to camp all in one piece.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3066.JPG

I have done a fair amount of trail running and run on a variety of different types of trails. So far in my experience the Appalachian Trail is the toughest trail I have ever run on. I am impressed by all the through hikers that take it on. I am even more amazed by those that have attempted and those who have succeeded at Fastest Known Time attempts on the Appalachian Trail. It has to be brutal. I cannot even imagine. I ran a total of 15 miles on two different days at it kicked my ass. But I would go back and run it some more in a heart beat.

Exploring More of the FLT

I had the opportunity to get out for a nice long exploration run today. I just had to decide where I wanted to run. I have really been enjoying exploring the Finger Lakes Trail and I decided I wanted to explore more of it. I wanted to run on a section that would be new to me. The question is where. There are so many options. I decided I wanted to go up to the Ithaca area and make a day of it. I was thinking about either starting in Danby State Forest or at the outlet of Robert Treman State Park and go up to Sweedler Preserve. I wanted to run about 8 miles out and back for a total of 16 miles. I decided that I would pick up where I have ended on the farthest out I have run in that direction, which is where the trail leaves Robert Treman State Park.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3093.JPG

I wanted to make this a nice casual run and enjoy some nature. I took my phone and my GoPro so I could capture some images of the trails. That is part of what I love about trail running, it has allowed me to experience and capture nature where I never would have been able to before. This trail run did not go as I had hoped especially in the beginning. I continuously tripped and stumbled along the path. Just not picking up my feet. I don’t know if I was stumbling along the path because I wasn’t running hard and focused or what. It was just not going smoothly. At one point I tripped so hard that I just about peeled the sole of the shoe off of the upper. I ripped a big split in the shoes along the seam of the upper and the sole. Thankfully these were an old pair of trail shoes. They were actually the first pair of trail shoes I had ever had, but I loved them and I liked running in them occasionally. They had served me well but now their time had come. I will miss you my super light weight, minimalist, do it all Teva Sphere trail shoes.

Then there is the other aspect that didn’t go so well, and that is the exploring a new section of trail. There was a long stretch on the road where I didn’t see any trail blazes along the road or on signs or anywhere. Maybe I just missed them. But it was a long section of road where you begin to doubt yourself and think that you should have gotten off the road by now. I have in the past missed turns to get off the road. My friends that have gone on trail adventures with me will tell you all about it. Luckily I had bought the downloadable maps and was using them with the Avenza app so I had GPS telling me if I was on the trail or not, and I was on the trail the whole time I was on the road and eventually came to the area where I left the road. Eventually I came to another section that was confusing. I emerged from the woods into a large field that was mostly overgrown except for a few areas. Once again I did not see any obvious blazes; maybe I just missed them again. I headed out in one of the two different directions where the field had been cleared figuring one of them had to be the trail. Turns out I chose wrong, but after a short time I was able to meet back up with the trail without having to backtrack. It just meant some bushwhacking through an overgrown field. As I trudged along through this field I was watching the map on the Avenza app and I could see that I was going in the same direction of the trail but I was slowly getting farther and farther away from it. I was basically tracking parallel to the FLT. I must have missed something. I started to back track and figured I must have been supposed to turn out of the field and into the woods at some point, but I never saw a place to do that. Where I was at the time there was a thick hedge row where you couldn’t see the woods. Eventually I found a thinning in the brush and pushed through into the woods. Now just navigating by GPS on the map looking for trail blazes and watching as my dot on the map got closer and closer to the trail. Eventually I found it and was back on the FLT. This was at about mile 5 and I was about to give up and turn back because I was so frustrated with not being able to find the trail. I would have had to turn back without the Avenza app.

Thankfully I found the trail and I was off and running again. I finished out that 8 miles almost reaching Danby State Forest which I would have liked to get to but it wasn’t really worth adding any extra miles at that point. I turned and began the run back to my car. The run back turned out to be much less eventful. No getting lost. No tripping and falling. It felt much more enjoyable. Maybe it was due to the fact that the return trip was essentially a nice meandering 8 mile assent while the way out was an 8 mile climb. That could have something to do with it. Especially since I much prefer going down than up. The only event occurred when at one point I emerged from the woods and heard a loud buzzing. It was like there could be a bee hive nearby. I looked around and didn’t see anything. I figured there just must be bees out in the field of flowers that I hear. Then all of a sudden something stung me. I took off at a sprint. Not so fun when you have already gone over 10 miles and have 3 or 4 still to go, but I wanted to get away from whatever the hell had just stung me. As I ran I determined that I think it was a huge horsefly that had bitten me as it continued to chase me down the trail trying to bite me. I even swatted it out of the sky once but that did not stop it. Eventually it gave up the chase as I reentered a wooded area.

As I began to feel better about the run my creative juices began to flow. I recorded several videos of the return trip using my GoPro and I also took some still photos using both my GoPro and my phone. The downhills were nice. I could have run faster but this run wasn’t about speed or hard effort, it was about fun and enjoying nature. I never actually felt like I was pushing too hard at any point during the run, except when I was trying to escape that horsefly. I figured that since I never really felt like I was struggling either on the uphills or downhills that there must not have been too much climbing. I figured I would be below 2000 ft elevation gain. I was surprised when I checked my Strava and saw that I was at almost exactly 2000 ft. So I am happy to have gotten out for a run exploring a new section of trail and enjoying myself and still getting in a decent amount of climbing which is where I really need to work anyway when I train. So all in all it was a good day.

I ended the day with a nice soak in the creek. I really needed that. Despite not pushing myself very hard on this run I have been battling some issues with hip pain and ankle pain and that cold water felt soooooo good. IT was amazing. I think I have another opportunity to go explore some trails again soon. So it is either pick up where I left off here and start at Danby State Forest or go the opposite direction and start at the farthest point that direction I have been at Birdseye Hollow Park. Oh the hard choices one has to make.

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3101.JPG

DCIM123GOPROGOPR3112.JPG

Osprey Series

I was sitting at the lake doing some writing and I heard osprey calling off in the distance. I looked around but didn’t see anything. Eventually I saw this osprey perched in a tree across the park. I was able to walk over and capture a series of photos of the osprey perched and then as the osprey took took off and flew away over the trees. The photographs are nice and sharp unfortunately the background is drab. It was overcast and cloudy most of the time. I do really like how the light shines through the tail feathers.

Ithaca_September 07, 2018_19Ithaca_September 07, 2018_21Ithaca_September 07, 2018_22Ithaca_September 07, 2018_23Ithaca_September 07, 2018_24Ithaca_September 07, 2018_25Ithaca_September 07, 2018_26Ithaca_September 07, 2018_27Ithaca_September 07, 2018_28Ithaca_September 07, 2018_29Ithaca_September 07, 2018_30Ithaca_September 07, 2018_31

Camping in Vermont

One of my favorite things to do is get out in nature and go camping someplace I have never been. This summer my wife and I decided to go to Vermont and camp with one of our dogs. We decided to camp at Gifford Woods State Park. We had narrowed the choice down to two different locations. I decided I wanted to check out Gifford Woods.
One of the main reasons I wanted to camp at Gifford woods was because it was literally right on the Appalachian Trail and that would allow me easy access to explore this legendary trail that I had previously never had the opportunity to check out. I wasted no time doing so. As soon as we arrived and unpacked the first thing I wanted us to do was go see where the Appalachian Trail met the campground and explore a little bit of the trail. As soon as we headed out we quickly learned that not only did the Appalachian trail run through our campground it literally lead right past our campsite. I thought I had spotted trail blazes on trees as we approached our campsite, but I didn’t know what they were for. We saw so many hikers pass by on the Appalachian Trail while we relaxed at our campsite, probably between a half-dozen and a dozen hikers every day. And that was just at the times we were actually at our campsite which was not most of the time, most days. It was quite impressive to see all the hikers.
Vermont_August 21, 2018_174
Kent Pond was just a short walk from our campsite. We visited several times.
We had purchased an AMC hikers guide to Vermont and marked off many different hikes we were interested in possibly doing while we were on our trip. There was one hike that we were excited to try out because it was right nearby our campground. We wanted to hike the Deer Leap Overlook hike. It was a relatively short, relatively easy hike with reportedly great views of the area. We followed the directions in the guide-book and parked at the noted parking location and started up the trail head we saw right in front of us. However, we missed one important detail. The trail head we wanted to be going up was across the road from where we had parked. We wouldn’t realize this for quite a while. Once we had been hiking long enough that we were sure we were likely not on the right path we decided to check to see what info we could find on out our phones. We discovered that we were not on Dear Leap but on the Sherburne Pass up to Pico Peak. The next decision was do we keep hiking up or head back down. We didn’t really have a good idea of how long or how far we had gone up or how much farther or longer it would take to reach the top. We didn’t really want to do all that hiking up a mountain without any reward of a nice view. We decided to continue up the mountain taking periodic breaks to reassess the situation and determine if we wanted to kep going and look at maps on our hones to get a sense of how close to the summit we were. We did eventually reach the summit and were rewarded with some nice views. The moral of that story is, if you want to climb a mountain but your wife might not accidental climb the wrong trail because you are both to stubborn to quite once you are out there. My wife said that she would not have wanted to climb the mountain if that was what we had set out to do. We would not have done it. But after having done it she was happy that she had done it and she felt good about having done it.
Pico Peak_August 19, 2018_11
The view from Pico Peak
In contrast to the mountain we climbed we also hiked around a short 1 mile trail at what must have been one of the flattest tracts of land in all of Vermont. There was essentially no elevation change on the trail. It was quite a nice relaxing little hike. This was on the Robert Frost Trail. All along the trail were posted Robert Frost poems to read as you relaxed and enjoyed the scenery which included a beautiful stream, some woodland, and even a more open field like area.
Robert Frost Trail_August 20, 2018_34
Robert Frost Trail.
After a nice casual stroll at the Robert Frost Trail we decided to venture on to a more difficult trail. We really wanted to go see what kind of views we could find overlooking some beautiful scenery. So we headed out to a section of the Long Trail noted in the guidebook as Sunset Ledge. This trail definitely had some challenging sections. It was a good workout. After hiking up for what seemed like longer than we should have been we were beginning to worry that we had gone astray again. Fortunately another hiker was headed towards us and when we inquired she said that we were close and that the view is great. She was not wrong. After a little more hiking we arrive at a nice overlook. We sat and enjoyed the view and took some photographs. We relaxed and just enjoyed being out in nature.
Sunset Ledge_August 20, 2018_41-2
Sunset Ledge
One thing that definitely has to be taken into account is that even when you are looking at a guide-book that gives you ratings of how difficult a trail is to hike with rating from easy to difficult you have to be mindful that the guide is essentially all relative. That means that a lot of the hikes are rated relative to the other hikes in the area and when you are in Vermont many of the hikes are mountainous or require a lot of elevation gain or are very long hikes. So a short hike that is rated as easy might still have over 400 ft of elevation which is not necessarily a lot of elevation gain but it feels like a lot more when you are covering that elevation in 1 mile. So the perceived effort of the hike, how you feel during the climbing of the hike can feel harder than one might expect from a hike that is rated as easy or easy/moderate. Also another consideration is the decent. It sounds simple enough to think that the climbing might be easy but coming back down will be easier. This may very well be true but it might also be the opposite. The exertion might feel like it is lessened but it still might be difficult depending on how steep the trail is and what the terrain is like. Going down a large rock surface can pose bigger challenges than going up it for example.
Vermont_August 24, 2018_264
One of my favorite features of the scenery that just happened to be purely chance and not part of the planning was this stream that flowed across the Appalachian Trail right near our camp. It was just a short walk away. I saw that spot probably more times than anywhere else. I stopped and took photos of it multiple times. It is really cool to me when you find these neet little hidden gems that are not predominant features of the landscape or well-known marked scenic spots and you can just check them out and enjoy it.
Appalachian Trail_August 21, 2018_22
I also got some running in while out camping and didn’t even have to travel to do it. It is a great feeling to be able to wake up put on your clothes and run off onto a trail without having to drive anywhere. I never did get up as early as I wanted for ay of the runs I went out on. I also never quite got the distance in that I wanted. As I learned quickly out on my runs the AT is no joke and you should not underestimate it. But I did enjoy my time running there and I took some videos and photos while I was running.
When we were in the early planning stages of our trip and had decided to camp at Gifford Woods in Killington, VT we started to check into things and see what else might be going on in the time frame we would be there. I was thinking that I would like to find a trail race to run. As it turned out there was a race going on that same week. The Under Armour Mountain Running Series was at Killington Mountain just a short drive from where we were staying. It seemd like the perfect opportunity. The event featured 5k, 10k, 25k, and 50k distances. The 25k was the only distance that really interested me. However, the cut off time was 4.5 hours and that was the amount time it took me to finish my last 25k that I thought would likely be comparable, so I wasn’t even sure I would be able to finish it if I ran. Also, as the time approached I was not in the healthiest place physically. I also wasn’t sure that I wanted the anxiety and worry that can come with having a race looming hanging over my head on what was supposed to be a fun trip with my wife. I decided not to run the race, but we did go and watch the event and cheered runners on and I took many, many photographs of people crushing their races. It was really fun to sit back and watch and enjoy the event as a spectator. I was definitely glad I chose that route. I was still able to get a goo amount of running in and enjoy the rest of the trip as well as take in a cool event. Win, win, win.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_1869
Under Armour Mountain Running Series, Killington, VT.
Then in the evening we found purely by chance what I think was the perfect way to round out and finish off our vacation. While at the running event we saw signs for a free outdoor concert at the same location later that night. So we went back that night and sat out on the side of a mountain listening to music and enjoying being outside. It was the perfect relaxing way to end a trip.

 

Photographing UA Mountain Running VT

My wife and I love to go camping. We planned a trip to camp in the mountains of Vermont this summer. We ended up choosing a campground near Killington, Vermont. Out of pure coincidence it turned out there was a race event happening in Killington during the same time frame that we would be camping. The Under Amour Mountain Running Series Killington, Vermont was the Saturday before we went home. I contemplated registering to run one of the races while we were on vacation but as fate would have it I would end up deciding not to race in the event for a variety of reasons and I am happy with that decision.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_117
I have been running for a while now and as I have gotten more invested in the sport my wife has become more invested as well. I think we both are at the point where we are just as happy going to watch a running event as we are to be running in an event. I enjoy it even more when I have a camera with me. Showing up to watch the Under Armour Mountain Running Series event in Killington, Vermont with my wife, my dog, and my camera was just about as perfect of a vacation activity as it gets for me.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_259
We arrived at the event to see the 5k runners take off as we were getting out of our car. We were in place to watch, cheer, and photograph the event in time to watch the 10k participants begin their race. We figured out where we wanted to watch the 5k runners finish from just in time to see the top two runners approaching us in a blazing fast time of 19 minutes, which we couldn’t believe after the announcer had reported that the winner from last year had finished in 30 minutes.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_416
We watched as the 5k runners crested the hill where we were standing and turned towards the finish. We were ready just in time for me to get some ok photographs of the race leaders and then watch them to the finish line. As the 5k rnners were finishing we turned to see the lead 10k runner begin descending the mountain in the other direction from where we had positioned ourselves. We positioned ourselves at the perfect spot. It was the confluence of the 10k course and the 5k course as they approached the finish line. The 5k runners approaching up over a hill from one direction and the 10k runners decending towards us from another direction. It was a lot of action to take in. I was honestly surprised there were no incidents of a 10k runner careening down the mountain at high-speed colliding with a 5k runner who had been slowed down by their ascent merging at just the wrong time. Thankfully that scenario did not unfold before us.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_871
After most of the 5k and 10k runners had passed us by we moved to a new location to watch the 25k and 50k runners. We had estimated how long we thought it would be until the first finishers of the 25k race would be getting done. We hiked up the trail for what turned out to be about a mile. We sat along the trail waiting for the runners to arrive. Soon enough the race leaders appeared on the trail kicking up dust behind them. We sat along the trail and cheered on the runners. Brynn, our dog barked to help encourage them. We were able to watch many of the 25k runners pass by on their way to finish the race. We stayed long enough to see some of the first finishers of the 50k race as well. Some of the runners were cruising to the finish, some of the runners were struggling. We tried to encourage them all along the way. Some of the runners we got to cheer multiple times as a few were unfortunate enough to miss a segment of the course and have to head back out on the trail to complete the areas they missed. So they got to run bonus miles.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_1003
I love watching races unfolds and capturing images of runners giving their all along the course. My photographs are no glamour shots they are photographs of runners giving their all and busting their buts. My wife is super supportive and encouraging as she cheers on the runners and I hope they get the same feeling from my presence on the course taking photographs and then again when they see the photographs from the race they just busted their ass for. Runners don’t always like seeing me out on the courese because I have a hbbit of being at some of the hardest segments of the course. Areas where they might not be at their best. Areas wher ethey might be struggling. Areas where they might feel weak. Most people think these don’t make the best photographs. I think they are the perfect photographs because it shows them concuring the hardest parts and it is proof of what they can do.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_1138
I love hearing my wife call out words of encouragement to the runners. It reminds me why I love this crazy sport so much. It’s about the people. The people who support us and cheer us, the people who are out there to watch us, the other runners we share time with on the course.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_1292
Check out my first album of photographs of several to come from the race here on Facebook at Kyle Reynolds/KRNaturalPhoto. The photographs are essentially unedited so the great the good, the blurry, and the out of focus photographs are all in there. I want them all to be available to the runners for them to enjoy.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_1300
If you like the work you see here please consider supporting me here on Patreon at KRNaturalPhoto for as little as $1 a month. Thank you.
UA MTN Running Killington_August 25, 2018_1385

Talking photography, dogs, and life.

%d bloggers like this: