Tag Archives: Corning

2019 Wineglass Half Marathon

I have now run 7 half marathons but this last one I ran might just be the one that means the most to me. I ran my first 5k around 6 years ago and my foray into running dates to before that time. I never really thought I would have a chance to experience what I did in this last race and it was truly special to me.

When I started running my wife had no interest. As I began to run more and more she supported me but didn’t understand why I did what I did especially as I began to actually enjoy running and testing myself. Then a couple years ago my wife decided she wanted to run a 5k and then an 8k and she did both of those things. She never expressed any interest in running any event farther than that distance. She would scoff at the idea of running a half marathon. She loved watching me run and push myself at races but she said it was not for her.

Then at the 2018 Wineglass Half Marathon a friend of hers had decided she was going to run it. We were there to cheer on the runners as we had the past year. My wife was able to cheer on her friend and see her as she closed in on accomplishing her goal. My wife was so inspired by her friend that shortly after that day she decided she also wanted to run the Wineglass Half Marathon and that she would run it in 2019.

Once she had gotten the idea firmly in her mind that she wanted to do it she committed and registered for the race early on. The first step was done.

My wife would be the one to tell you she is not really a runner. She doesn’t really run and go on and on and equivocate about not being a real runner because she run walks and mostly walks and isn’t very fast. I have always tried to instill in her that if you do any amount of running at any pace and go any distance, YOU ARE A RUNNER.

I think that the “I am not a real runner” mindset is hard to break. I also think that this mindset makes other things even more challenging than they have to be.

When you first get the notion of running a race into your head, the idea of running the race seems fun and that is what you focus on. The hard part is committing to the training. This is especially hard early on in the process. It is even more challenging when you set an ambitious goal, but that goal is far way on the calendar. I think this is where my wife struggled. She wanted to do more running than she had at her previous races and fully recognized that she would need to train more in order to do that and to do it at a much longer distance than she had experienced, but there was just so much time between the present and that future race day that it was always easy to delay starting the training process.

Then when we finally did get the training process started there were all too frequent setbacks due to various injuries that would cause training to cease and then it was really a struggle to get back into training each time. So the process of training was really challenging.

As race day drew near we were able to finally find some consistency in my wife’s training. She was able to log miles using her run/walk strategy. We took a vacation and logged miles hiking and exploring, but then there was another injury. It was getting very frustrating for her with all the setbacks especially when she was finally finding her groove in training.

Then I was in the process of getting the in the final push for training for my 100 miler and trying to figure out how best to help her train. We decided on a strategy of focusing on her getting used to as much distance as she could. That meant mostly walking, but miles are miles. I would go out for my long runs on my training and my wife would go with me. I would run a mile then circle back to her and check in with her and we would go until I got as many miles as I needed and she would rack up miles all the while checking in with each other after each mile. This strategy worked out even better than I had hoped and it was so nice to be out there working towards our goals together.

In the last several weeks leading up to the race we tried to focus on race strategy and pace for her to execute at the race. My wife really wanted to be done in 3.5 hours. She felt that it was an attainable goal given how her training had went. So we had to devise a plan to get her there. We set out on various training runs trying out different walk run strategies and seeing how they felt. And then came more leg pains and setbacks to training. So much frustration in the training.

Finally we were able to settle on a plan of run for 30 seconds and walk for 1 minute that she tried out and felt pretty good. It allowed her to move at a pretty decent pace and run normally during the 30 seconds and then have time to recover before another burst of running and didn’t cause too much fatigue. It seemed like a plan that could be executed over 13.1 miles. Critically it also should get her in under her goal according to our estimates.

Then a week before the race I got sick, but I recovered in a few days. Then my wife got sick. Never a good sign. Colds have a tendency to kick her but. In a few days she was down and out. Leaving work early one day and then calling in sick the next. Not something my wife takes lightly she is kind of a workaholic in that way. So two days before her first half marathon my wife was so sick she missed work. Not ideal, obviously. We were both nervous. How would this impact her ability to run the race? Would she even be able to run the race? If she could go to the race would she be able to run at all or would it just be a long walk. Luckily by race day my wife was feeling much better and we took cold medicine to the race for her to use.

Emotionally at least, the days leading up to the race went smoothly and my wife, at least outwardly, seemed relatively relaxed despite what was approaching for her. She said she was nervous but really handled it well.

On race day we boarded the bus and got to the start line uneventfully, exactly what you want on race day, especially for ones first half marathon. We were there plenty early to stretch and get prepared. We talked about how to start the race. It would be very exciting and it would be fun to just run as much as possible at the beginning. But we discussed the importance of sticking to our plan. It will be hard to let people go by us as we execute our run/walk plan but it will benefit us in the end. We made a plan and now we need to execute it.

The race started and we crossed the start line. My wife was now running her first half marathon. Something I never thought would happen and something I bet she really never thought would happen. We executed our plan. We ran and we walked. Occasionally running or walking more or less as seemed appropriate. It was amazing. My wife was doing so well. Despite all the setbacks. The injuries, the nagging leg pains. The cold the week of the race. She was conquering it all. She was doing this. Not only was she doing it she was doing it well. She was executing the race plan exactly the way we had discussed. I checked in with her frequently to see how she felt and she felt good almost the entire race. No pain. Not much effects from the cold. We had packed my race vest full of tissues just in case, but we only ended up using a small handful of tissues over the course of the race.

I could not have been more happy for my wife at how this race was going for her. I knew she was nervous about it especially after getting sick. I know she had doubts about whether or not she could do it and do it the way she wanted to with a run/walk strategy. I always tried to reassure her. But I would be lying if I said I expected it to go as well for her as it did.


We went along at our intended pace and before you knew it 5k done. I told my wife think about this. You had so many setbacks this year, but you just ran a 5k and you feel fine. You feel better than you had on any of your other 5k races. You felt better than you did on your training runs. I tried to build her confidence by pointing out how well she was doing. It was just so great to see her out here feeling so well.

Then the next milestone hit before you knew it. We were approaching the 8k distance. I think that made us both a little nervous because we both knew what that meant. We were about you cross not uncharted territory. My wife had been able to walk longer distances, but she had never gone farther than an 8k at the pace we were going using this run/walk strategy. Still she felt strong. She was happy and in good spirits. We entered uncharted territory and continued to sail through it without so much of a hiccup.

It is kind of amazing to me to see someone running their first half marathon who is in as good of spirits as my wife was. She was happy and friendly. We talked a lot. She talked to everyone on the course she could. She thanked every single volunteer we crossed paths with.

Through mile ten she had barely a complaint. She felt fine. She was in good spirits. Our strategy was working. She was overcoming all the obstacles thst had been put in her path. After mile ten my wife started to waver. Her energy was starting to ebb. It was noticeable that she was slowing down. Then at just the right moment one of our friends who was volunteering at a water station. After we ran by, he road out onto the course to provide some levity and entertainment to lift us up and it really helped get us smiling though a tough stretch.

As we neared the end of the race my wife seemed to be in awe of what was happening. She was actually accomplishing this huge goal she never even thought she’d ever take on. In the last few miles she said multiple times “I can’t believe I’m doing this.” I told her “It is amazing when you start to find out just what you are capable of.” My wife was getting tired but she still felt pretty good despite everything. She could start to see the light at the end of the tunnel. As we got close to the end it really began to hit my wife. She was going to finish this race. She said, “I can’t believe I am actually going to finish.” She began t get emotional and tears began to well up in her eyes. She began to cry. I don’t know if she ever really truly believed that she would be able to do this. She wanted to and dreamed about it and hoped to be able to do it, but I don’t know if she ever believed she could. Now she was proving to herself that she could do it and she was doing it and she was going to finish. Seeing my wife so happy and so close to accomplishing her goal and her tears of joy and emotions overflowing almost ha me crying. I had to keep my emotions in check so she could focus on what she needed to do, but I was just so overwhelmingly happy for her.

We turned onto Market Street. We continued to execute our plan. We ran the section of Market Street that we had planned to run through to the finish line and we ran through the cheering crowd and crossed that finish line together. It was an amazing feeling. I hugged my wife. Meb would have to wait.

This was the most amazing experience for me. As much as it was for my wife. This is the kind of experience I have dreamed about having. I think anyone who runs has had these thoughts. Thoughts of how great it would be to be able to go out and run with your spouse or significant other. To be able to share in this thing you love. To go out and move your bodies and enjoy what running has to offer together. For a long time I never thought this would be something I would experience. As I dove deeper into running my wife seemed to become more resolute that she was not going to be a runner. Then she began to get interested in running. We have now run around six events together including this half marathon. Being able to share this with my wife is so special to me.

Experiencing this race with her. Seeing her run her first half marathon up close and personal. See her enjoy running. Watching her smile and and talk to people and thank every volunteer. To see her joy in running this race. It makes me so happy. It is a memory I will never forget.

My wife will probably continue to say she is not a runner despite my admonishments. We don’t run the same pace. But we can still get out and have fun running together. We make time to do some running with each other and it makes all the difference in the world to me. I think she thinks it is a sacrifice or me to slow down and run with her, but for me it is the biggest joy I can get. I get to be out here doing something I love with the woman I love. There could not be a bigger gift that she could give to me. She will tell you she is slow and that she doesn’t really run, but I can see a day in the future when I am asking her to slow down and run a race with me.

My wife talked about how much fun she had running the Wineglass Half Marathon and how it was better than she expected. She is already talking about running it again next year. If she could do it this year despite all the setbacks, how much better could she do next year if things went smoother for her?

Corning Rugby Action Sequences

I was fortunate enough to have an opportunity to watch our local Corning Rugby Boys and and Girls teams play again.

I was happy to have captured what I think are some really nice action sequences.

This sequence was a nice extended sequence with the Corning Rugby Girls in possession and making several passes.

Corning Girls defense in action.

A nice run during the Corning Boys rugby match.

Another nice run by the Corning Boys rugby team.

Kicking off a new venture

I have been planning to take my photography in a new direction for a while now. What I have been wanting to do is teach photography. I have been thinking about this and developing plans for a while.

Now is the time I will be kicking this new venture off. I will be starting off by volunteering to lead two, one hour long nature photography workshops at the Corning Museum of Glass. We will be walking around the campus at the CMOG and looking for interesting things to photograph and talking about nature and photography.

If you are looking for something to do this Saturday join me at the Corning Museum of Glass from 1 to 2 PM or from 2 to 3 PM for a nature photography workshop.

Following this I will be adding more workshops I will be offering. Follow me here or on Facebook for more information regarding upcoming events. You can contact me through my website or social media with any questions you have.

These photographs are just a sample of what we can hope to see . I photographed them on a short walk around the CMOG recently.

Hope to see you Saturday.

You can find more information about the event at Corning Museum of Glass

Photographing Myself Running

We all have our own little idiosyncrasies. Sometimes we don’t really know why we do the things we do. Other times it’s pretty obvious why we do them. I know exactly why I do some of the things I do.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_4

The things that really move us, the things that are important a to us, the things we love. This is what causes us to do some of the strange things we do as humans. As a photographer, something I love, I carry around enough gear that my car tells me the passenger needs to put on their seatbelt when I set my bag on the passenger seat. I often have these multiple heavy cameras dangling from my neck while I look ridiculous. I can be found laying on the ground or just staring at something just waiting for the perfect moment to take the photograph. Most non photographers would think these behaviors are a bit odd but to me they are the things that allow me to do what I love.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_14

Over the past several years I have also become a fairly avid runner as improving my health has become important. Avid, not good or fast just avid. I get up at 5:00 am on my day off to make sure I get my run in before it gets too hot. I run for over an hour at one time. I run in the rain. I plan my days around trying to make sure I can get a run in. These are not things that very many non runners would typically do.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_48

Over the years both my photography and running have grown in importance to me. Each becoming an increasingly significant part of my life.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_101

When you live for photography and live for a healthy lifestyle you do increasing odd things. On Sunday 10/4/2015 I ran my fist ever half marathon. And my enthusiasm for running crashed headlong into my passion for photography and they merged. I decided the best way to make the most out of this situation would be to find a way to photograph the half marathon as I ran it. In years past I never though this would be possible because A. I could never have run a half marathon and B. I would have had no idea how to go running with a Nikon D300 around my neck.  But thanks to my relatively recent decision to begin experimenting with a Nikon 1 system in my photography I was able to find a way to make it happen. I was able to find a small snug fitting elastic belt pouch that stretched and was marketed to be used to carry ones phone and keys while running. As luck would have it the pouch would also fit a Nikon 1. I was able to tuck the Nikon 1 into the pouch and wear it to the starting line with my regular running gear no problem. It was hardly noticeable. I got it out  and took a few pre-race photos.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_116

I considered getting the camera out at different times during the race. But in the first six miles I was maintaining a pretty good pace for myself and I didn’t want to risk getting off my pace and slowing down to monkey with the pouch and get the camera out and then try to put it away again. I hadn’t had time to practice with it before the race. That was a big mistake.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_149

In the last four miles I was too tired and spent to consider using any energy work a camera. All my mental energy was going to focusing on running and making sure I finished the race. I was getting very tired and very sore. It was all I could do to keep putting one foot in front of the other.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_165

Then as I neared the finish line probably inside of a mile I knew I was definitely going to finish. I had slowed considerably so my pace wasn’t an issue. I wouldn’t have to worry about putting the camera away I would just carry it to the end. So I decided now was the time to see what I could do with this little camera I carried all the way for 13 miles.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_171

I was able to unzip my pouch and get the camera out without impacting my running or dropping the camera. Now that’s a small victory in itself. I kept the camera strap on the camera even though it could make it more difficult to put away on the run, which I ended up not doing, and in glad I did. This freed me from worrying about dropping the camera while trying to looks round for something interesting to photograph and running. I could just simply throw the strap around my neck and that was that.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_174

Now it was time to try to figure out how to actually take some photos while running. I decided to try to experiment and try a few different things. Having the camera strap on allowed me to try something similar to having a GoPro strapped to my chest. I allowed the camera to essentially dangle from my neck and just tried to keep it straight. I thought I’d be able to get a photo as if directly from the runners perspective this way. I think it was difficult to make sure the camera was oriented properly to capture a decent image of what was in front of me. I am not sure any of these images turned any good. I think I often ended up with too much road in the photo and not enough subjects due to how low the camera strap hung and a wide-angle lens and not angling the camera up at all.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_177

I tried glancing over my shoulder to see what was going on behind me. I was able to get quick looks at my fellow runners as they usually approached and passed me. I then tried to position the camera over my shoulder facing the runners behind me so I could get a view of runners approaching me. It was a challenge to get the camera aligned right to be pointing straight and at the runners while also running however slowly I may have been going.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_184

I also attempted two other ways of taking photos of what I was seeing as I ran. I experimented with alternatingly holding the camera up in front of my face in a more traditional position to view the image and at other times just holding the camera out in front of me arms fully extended towards my intended subjects.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_193

This is where having the live view LCD screen of the Nikon 1 was invaluable. I don’t think I could have gotten decent photos of I had to try to look through a viewfinder. I was able to quickly select a subject and compose the image using the LCD and click the shutter all without compromising my safety by blocking most of my vision with a bulky camera that I had to hold up to my face to see through the viewfinder.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_199

I was even able to take a selfie style photo one-handed and I crossed the finish line, which was announced to the crowd as I crossed. I certainly couldn’t have done that with my Nikon D300.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_53-2

Overall this was a fun experience on all fronts. I challenged myself in many ways physically, mentally, and technically in both my running and photography. Trying something new is always an opportunity to learn and grow and I think I did.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_1

I also think I captured some nice images if I do say so myself. I think I will try this photography experiment in other running events and other experiences.

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_7

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_19

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_36

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_48

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_64

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_68

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_73

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_93

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_102

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_120

Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_141 Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_142Wine Glass Half Marathon_October 04, 2015_155