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Eastern Chipmunks are pretty ubiquitous little creatures in the woods.

They are often seen and heard on any hike.

I find Eastern Chipmunks to be quite adorable critters and they make good photography subjects.

But despite their omnipresence the Eastern Chipmunks can be challenging photography subjects.

Eastern Chipmunks do not sit still very long. So as a photographer you have to find them, train your lens on them and take the photo fairly quickly.

You also need a relatively fast shutter speed to capture them crisply especially if they move.

And to get close up as a photographer you may need a longer telephoto lens which will also require a fast shutter speed to avoid camera shake.

And the faster shutter speed can be difficult to achieve because chipmunks often live in the woods and the woods tend to be relatively dark due to the tree canopy.

To capture this image I had to crank up my ISO to 1600. And that still only got me to a 1/250 sec shutter speed.

I was pretty happy with the sharpness of the photo considering the less than ideal 1/250 shutter speed.

The high ISO created some amount of noise/grain in the image. So I leaned into that aspect in Lightroom and used a preset that accentuated the grain/noise look. This also brought out a lot of detail in the Eastern Chipmunk and made it look very sharp.

Photo details: Nikon D300. Nikon 300mm f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 1600. 1/250 sec. f/5.6.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today for this close up look at an Eastern Chipmunk.

Check out this image as an Eastern Chipmunk peaks out from a tree.

Eastern Chipmunks

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I love it when I get an opportunity to photograph some mammals in the wild.

Common Muskrats are cool little creatures.

I most often see them swimming in various boddies of water.

It definitely seems like you can see a Common Muskrat anyplace there is water.

Having the opportunity to see a Common Muskrat on land and photograph it was nice.

I love the reflection of the Muskrat in the water.

Photo details: Nikon D300. Nikon 300mm f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 400. 1/640sec. f/5.6.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today.

Check out this photo of some more behavior from a Common Muskrat.

Common Muskrats

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Waterfalls are always nice subjects for photography.

It is even more interesting when you can photograph them in different ways.

One way to see waterfalls in a different form is to go see them during the colder months if you can.

Watching how waterfalls transform as they begin to freeze when temperatures drop is so interesting.

There are opportunities to capture all sorts of unique images.

The water flow changes and ice appears in various parts of the falls.

And if the waterfall freezes and then thaws and then freezes again later it may very well like completely different.

Take advantage of winter to find some interesting takes on waterfalls.

Photo details: Nikon D300S. Tamron 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3. Focal length 28mm. ISO 100. 1/3 sec. f/13.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today as we begin to cool down in December.

Here is another view of a Frozen Waterfall.

Freezing Waterfall

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I hope everyone is enjoying the holiday.

If you are looking for some photography ideas around the holiday, especially if you live in the colder climates and don’t want to go outside, consider working with your holiday decorations.

There are a lot of interesting and creative things you can do with decorations.

What I did in this image is illuminate this translucent jar from behind to give it a glowing type of effect. and I set up a strand of lights in the background.

Another idea. Take any lights you have and move them around while shooting a long exposure image on your camera.

Also get close up with a macro lens and look close up at the sparkles and the fabric of the decorations.

Photo details: Nikon D500. Nikon 60mm f/2.8. Focal length 60mm. ISO 400. 1/100 sec. f/3.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today. Hope you are having an amazing holiday.

Christmas Decorations

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We love to try to grow plants all around our home.

The plant we have added to our yard which has grown most strongly has been this flowering cherry tree.

I don’t even know how long this tree has been growing outside out house now. It has grown large and it has grown strong.

This means every year if nothing else I have an opportunity to try my hand at creating new photographs featuring these delicate cherry tree blossoms.

Photo details: Nikon D300. Nikon 60mm f/2.8. Focal length 60mm. ISO 400. 1/1600 sec. f/9.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today for a beautiful cherry tree blossom.

You can see a mix of flowering trees, wildflowers, and garden flowers in my gallery of images featuring Flowers.

Flowering Cherry Tree

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I am really fascinated by the Northern Catalpa tree.

I am currently trying to grown one in my backyard, but our dog Colton keeps eating it.

The large size and interesting shape of the blossoms on the tree are visually appealing.

The mostly white flower blossoms are punctuated by yellow and red patterns leading into the center of the flower blossom.

Another cool feature of the Northern Catalpa is its size.

Many flowering trees are rather small. The Northern Catalpa on the other hand grow to be enormous.

I have been trying to capture an image of a Northern Catalpa tree that features the entire tree in the photo.

My goal is to show there beauty of these trees from tree trunk to tree top.

I don’t really feel like I have succeeded in creating an image like that which I am satisfied with yet.

Photo details: Nikon D300S. Nikon 60mm f/2.8. Focal length 60mm. ISO 400. 1/6400 sec. f/2.8.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today for a feature of the Northern Catalpa.

Here is a close up image of a Northern Catalpa Flower Blossom.

Northern Catalpa

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There are so many great places for photography near where I live.

One of the coolest spots is the Cornell Botanic Gardens.

What makes this location so special as that there is a different magical beauty to behold at different times of the year.

The types of plants and flowers you see might be different on every visit. It all depends on what time of year you show up.

I try to visit at a variety of times over the course of the year or years.

I always want to see as many different things as I can.

But in spring the itch to get there really hits me.

After a long winter of no fresh plant growth to photograph seeing the signs of spring beginning to emerge really gets me excited about the abundance of opportunities there are to behold at the Cornell Botanic Gardens.

In early spring one of their earliest flowers to see are the Magnolia Tree blossoms.

The last few years seem to have been challenging for many of these trees. We have had several years where the weather warms up and then we are hit with a harsh cold spell and this decimates the flower blossoms.

I am hoping that this trend does not continue in the future, but the weather in upstate New York can be quite unpredictable.

Photo details: Nikon D300S. Nikon 60mm f/2.8. Focal length 60mm. ISO 400. 1/500 sec. f/2.8.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today for this burst of purple.

In this image you can see magnolia blossoms before they bloom.

Magnolia Tree

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One of the best parts of early spring is flowering trees.

Flowering trees are one of the first things to make it clear that spring is on its way.

Sometimes it just seems like one minute there are bare trees and next thing you know flowers are popping off the branches of a bunch of trees.

Hawthorns seem to be pretty abundant flowering trees to se in the spring.

The hawthorn blossoms make for great early spring photography subjects.

Not only do they provide a nice bright early spring subject in the flowers, but they also attract early spring pollinators.

Then you can practice flower photography and insect photography all at once.

Photo details: Nikon D300S. Nikon 300mm f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 400. 1/4000 sec. f/5.6.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today for some bright flowers.

Here is a similar image from my gallery of a Hawthorn Tree.

Hawthorn Tree

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There are a few of our local parks that I visit pretty regularly.

One of my frequently visited spots is Sperr Park.

I love it here any time of year, but the spring is particularly beautiful.

The flowers planted here are starting to bloom and these beautiful flowering trees are in full bloom.

These trees are bright and majestic. I love them.

There don’t seem to be many places I have come across with these particular flowering trees.

But it could be that I am just missing them when they are in bloom.

The flowers bloom in spring but do not stick around too long.

There is a very fleeting beauty to these trees.

But getting to see them in full bloom on this occasion was just perfect.

Photo details: SONY Alpha 6000. SONY 20mm f/2.8. Focal length 20mm. ISO 100. 1/640 sec. f/2.8.

Thank you for joining me on the blog for a beautiful photograph of one of our local parks.

You can see more of my photography on my Archives Gallery.

Sperr Park

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Flowers are always beautiful.

Flowering trees have a special allure to them.

And even more fantastical are wild growing flowering trees.

Wild Dogwood Trees are among my favorite plants.

I appreciate every opportunity I have to photograph their beautiful blossoms.

The flowers don’t last very long after they emerge in early spring.

I am fortunate enough to have some that grow right near my house, but I am always excited to be visiting someplace new and stumble across Dogwood Trees in the wild.

Photo details: Nikon D300. Tamron 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3. Focal length 200mm. ISO 320. 1/800 sec. f/8.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today for a look at one of my favorite trees.

If you like this phot you can see macro view of one Dogwood Flower.

Dogwood Tree

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