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The Weimaraner.

I really adore the Weimaraner.

I can’t really explain why. I’ve never had an interaction with a Weimaraner.

Their color is alluring.

The look in their eyes.

Combine the color of their coat with the color of their eyes and it poses some kind of ghostly aura.

This portrait shows off both of those qualities that draw me to the Weimaraner.

Photo details: Nikon D300S. Nikon 300m,m f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 500. 1/1250 sec. f/5.6.

Thank you for joining me here for todays photography blog post as I admire the Weimaraner.

If you enjoyed this photo of a Weimaraner you can see another by clicking this link to a photo of a Weimaraner.

Weimaraner

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The Vizsla.

I love it when I have a chance for a really nice in close shot.

A close up portrait of just the dogs head.

Being able to see all the details. The texture in the nose. Each fleck of hair a different color. The brilliant color of the eyes.

And even the adorably flipped over ear.

This Vizsla is so adorable.

Take time and get up close to your subject if you can.

Photo Details: Nikon D300S. Nikon 300mm f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 500. 1/3200 sec. f/5.6.

Thanks for joining me here for todays photography blog post.

If you enjoyed this photo check out more dog show photos from the Wine Country Circuit.

Vizsla

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Watching the end of a group competition in conformation is fun and exciting.

Seeing the dogs the judge selects as they form their short list of top candidates for the win.

The dogs and handlers line up and show their stuff one last time for the judge.

Then the judge selects the best dog in the group.

I love it when the handlers and dogs react to the win with joy and exuberance.

Check out this Toy Fox Terrier bounding with excitement as their handler smiles down at them

Photo details: Nikon D300. Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8. Focal length 125mm. ISO 400. 1/1000 sec. f/13.

Terrier Group

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The Standard Schnauzer.

Most people would probably think of the Standard Schnauzer as a show dog competing in conformation at a dog show.

I love seeing dogs turn that on its head.

Seeing dogs do something other than what one might expect is a joy.

I don’t think I have had the good fortune of seeing a Standard Schnauzer compete in Obedience Trails other than this one time.

It is cool to see the Standard Schnauzer jumping this hurdle on upon receiving the cue from their human.

Photo details: Nikon D300S. Nikon 300mm f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 400. 1/3200 sec. f/5.6.

Standard Schnauzer

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The Standard Poodle.

When I say poodle I know what image instantly comes to mind. It is the same for me. It is what we all imagine.

We all see that immaculately groomed Standard Poodle. Hair blown out into big puffballs. A look that seems to serve no purpose.

Our perception of the Standard Poodle is heavily influenced by what we see. To our minds this image makes usd think of the Poodle as a very spoiled dog. The kind of dog that wouldn’t want to get its foot wet or mess up their hair.

So I wanted to share an image to shake that perception up a little bit. There is much more to a Standard Poodle than what we see in the show ring.

Take a look at a Standard Poodle in the agility competition. Hair groomed in a more functional manner.

The Standard Poodle having fun running and jumping and clearing hurdles.

Photo details: Nikon D500. Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8. Focal length 170mm. ISO 400. 1/8000 sec. f/2.8.

Check out more photos I have taken of Dogs.

What do you think about the Standard Poodle? Let me know in the comments.

Thanks fo stopping by the blog. I hope you enjoyed this different look at a Standard Poodle.

Standard Poodle

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The Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

This is a breed of dog that has really grown on me over the years.

I was never sure what to make of this and similar breeds of dogs.

Spending time volunteering at our local shelter and seeing first hand and interacting with terrier mixes similar to these dogs really shaped me. Then having our own terrier mix at home for several years now really cemented it.

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a breed I always look for now at the dog shows. They are strong powerful dogs. But they are super cute and friendly as well.

I think we have been fortunate enough to be able to interact with this breed of dogs at dog shows more than many others.

Photo details: Nikon D300S. Nikon 300mm f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 400. 1/800 sec. f/5.6.

Is there a breed of dog that has really grown on you over the years? Tell me about it in the comments.

Check out another photo of a Staffordshire Bull Terrier from my gallery.

Thanks for taking a minute to drop by the photography blog today.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

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The Spinone Italiano.

These dogs are just so cute.

I absolutely adore them.

It makes me sad that I have seen them so seldom.

I don’t even have that many photographs of them in my archives. Fewer than 200 images of the Spinone Italiano.

That’s not the fewest I have of any breed of dog, but it is significantly lower than many. Especially for a breed of dog that I find so darn cute.

I really hope that I see more of this breed soon. I have not photographed one in five years.

Photo details: NikonD300. Nikon 300mm f/4. Focal length 420mm. ISO 400. 1/500 sec. f/5.6.

Thanks for stopping by the blog today to see this photo of a Spinone Italiano. If this is the first time you have seen one let me know in the comments.

Check out more show dog photos I have taken in this gallery from the Wine Country Circuit.

Spinone Italiano

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The Saint Bernard.

This is my favorite type of image to capture.

Moments of people with their dogs.

Those simple times we spend just being in the presence of our amazing dogs that we love so much.

I was happy to be able to capture an image of this person siting with their old Saint Bernard just relaxing and watching the dog show.

Photo details: Nikon D300. Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8. Focal length 70mm. ISO 400. 1/3200 sec. f/2.8.

Do you love Saint Bernards? Check out this gallery of more photos I have taken of Saint Bernards.

Thanks for joining the blog today to share our love of dogs.

Saint Bernard

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My afternoon adventure on my first full day in the Adirondacks turned into an evening adventure because I took a nap in my hammock at camp for longer than I had expected. By the time I convinced myself to get out of camp It was getting to be early evening hours.

I enjoy photographing waterfalls. I have a guidebook to waterfalls in the Adirondack region. In the past I have focused on waterfalls that are easily accessible. On this trip I wanted to branch out and try to photograph a few waterfalls that required a little more hiking. I was willing to go at least a mile to get to a waterfall.

I arrived at the trail head that my guide book indicated for Cascade on Crane. Time to unpack my camera gear and assemble it. Full size tripod. DSLR with battery grip. 18-200mm zoom lens.

Hiking to a waterfall

I was excited to hike out and photograph this cascade that flowed down into a pond from the side of a mountain. I was willing to carry all of this camera gear with me because the hike itself wasn’t too long. It turned out to be a little over 2.5 miles round trip. And the guide book indicated that there would be “some elevation” involved in the hike. So, I knew I would have to do a little climbing but it didn’t sound like it was going to be too much.

What I didn’t realize is that according to the person who wrote the guide book “some elevation” apparently could mean almost 1,000 feet of elevation over at most about 1 mile of hiking distance. This is the equivalent of some of the steeper sections of climbing high peaks mountains in the Adirondacks.

With this level of elevation gain and the steepness of the terrain there was some definitely some slow going times. Carrying all the camera gear I chose to take with me did not make it any easier. Although there were actually times the tripod came in handy as a make shit trekking pole.

Eventually I came to the area where the cascade was supposed to be according to the guide book and maps. Guess what? No cascade. Almost no water at all. It was dried up from the hot summer weather. That was disappointing after all the effort to get the camera gear necessary for shooting waterfalls up onto the mountain.

Cascade: pond

Alternatives to photographing the falls

Fortunately, the cascade was supposed to be running into a pond. And the view a the mountainside pond was beautiful. I stopped along the trail as it passed by the pond several times to take photographs. It was made even more beautiful my the late evening sunlight. The sun was getting low creating that beautiful golden hour light that we often chase as photographers.

Hmm. Sun is getting low. Guess I better get off this mountain then. The difficulty of the hiking on this mountain, due to the vague description of “some elevation” in the guidebook left me a little unprepared. I really try to never be unprepared. But I expected to be able to make faster progress on the hiking portion of the adventure.

The hike up was challenging and slow. And there were times when the hike back down from the mountain were just as tricking and slow. It started to get dark out. I did not have a headlamp with me or a flashlight.

Getting back to the trail head

I was off the mountain but still had some distance to go on relatively flat trails before I would be back at the trail head. This is where the beauty of technology comes in. Not only did I have a fully GPS enabled map on my phone, but I also had a flashlight built right in. And I used that resource to light the way all the way back to my car.

If I had realized how steep that climb was going to be I either would not have carried that much gear with me or I would not have chosen to photograph this location, at least not so late in the day. Tip to writers of guide books. Please include at least a vague guestimate of how much elevation is involved in a hike. Saying there is “some elevation” is not sufficient.

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The Siberian Husky.

I think Siberian Huskies are some of the happiest dogs. They just always look happy. In every single photo that I take.

I have always loved Siberian Huskies. I always wanted to have one. I have now been fortunate enough to share my home with one for the last 14 years.

But that does not dull my joy and excitement at seeing them at dog shows. I still love to see them.

Look how happy this Husky is. Mouth wide open. Tongue partly out. Eyes bright and attentive.

Photo details: Nikon D300. Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8. Focal length 125mm. ISO 400. 1/400 sec. f/2.8.

Check out this photo of our Husky, Mojo in this gallery of Our Dogs.

Thank you for joining me on the blog today to share our love of the Siberian Husky.

Siberian Husky

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